Deepfakes on Social Media Prompt Warnings of AI Risks

Computers & TechnologyInternet

  • Author Dr. Matthew Ogunbukola
  • Published May 13, 2023
  • Word count 800

Abstract

Deepfakes, a technique using artificial intelligence to create manipulated videos and images, have become increasingly prevalent on social media. While initially used for entertainment purposes, the potential dangers of deep fakes have become a growing concern, prompting warnings of the risks posed by AI. Deepfakes can be used to spread misinformation, create political propaganda, or damage reputations.

In addition, they can erode trust in information and institutions, making it more challenging to differentiate between truth and falsehood. Researchers and experts have called for increased regulation and education to address the risks posed by deep fakes. The development of effective detection tools is also crucial to mitigate the harm caused by these technologies.

Introduction

Deepfakes are videos or audio recordings that have been manipulated to make it look or sound like someone is saying or doing something they never actually said or did. These videos can be very convincing, and they are becoming increasingly easy to create. As a result, there are growing concerns about the potential risks of deep fakes, particularly on social media.

One of the biggest concerns about deep fakes is that they could be used to spread misinformation or propaganda. For example, a deep fake could be used to make it look like a politician is saying something controversial or offensive or to make it look like a celebrity is endorsing a product or service. Deepfakes could also be used to damage someone's reputation or to blackmail them.

The rise of deep fakes to create realistic-looking videos or audio of people saying or doing things they never actually said or did, is raising concerns about the potential for these technologies to be used to spread misinformation, damage reputations, or even influence elections.

Deepfakes have been around for some years, they are becoming more prevalent on social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram, and TikTok. This is worrying because deep fakes can be used to spread misinformation, defame individuals or organizations, and even manipulate public opinion.

Deepfakes are created using artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to manipulate existing images or videos to create new ones. The technology is still in its early stages, but it has already been used to create convincing deep fakes of celebrities, politicians, and other public figures.

There have been several high-profile cases of deep fakes being used to spread misinformation. In one case, a deep fake video of former President Barack Obama was used to make it appear as though he was endorsing a particular candidate in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary. In another case, a deep fake video of a female politician was used to make it appear as though she was making sexist remarks.

These cases have raised concerns about the potential for deep fakes to be used to manipulate public opinion and influence elections. In a recent survey, 72% of Americans said they were worried about the potential for deep fakes to be used to spread misinformation during the 2024 presidential election.

The rise of deep fakes is also raising concerns about the potential for these technologies to be used to damage reputations or even commit fraud. For example, a deep fake video could be used to make it appear as though someone is saying or doing something embarrassing or illegal. This could be used to damage someone's reputation or even get them fired from their job.

And can be used to commit fraud. For example, a deep fake video could be used to make it appear as though someone is giving their consent to a financial transaction. This could be used to steal money or commit identity theft.

The potential risks of deep fakes are significant, and it is important to be aware of them. Many things can be done to mitigate the risks, including:

• Educating people about deep fakes and how to spot them.

• Developing technology to detect and remove deep fakes.

• Creating laws and regulations to govern the use of deep fakes.

• The rise of deep fakes is a reminder of the potential dangers of AI. As AI technologies continue to develop, it is important to be aware of the potential risks and take steps to mitigate them.

References:

Hao, K. (2019, January 29). The scary truth about what deep fakes can do. MIT Technology Review. https://www.technologyreview.com/2019/01/29/137293/the-scary-truth-about-deepfakes/

Tene, O. (2019, October 31). Deepfakes and the new disinformation war: The coming age of post-truth geopolitics. Foreign Affairs. https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/2019-10-31/deepfakes-and-new-disinformation-war

Brundage, M., Avin, S., Clark, J., Toner, H., Eckersley, P., Garfinkel, B., Dafoe, A., Scharre, P., Zeitzoff, T., Filar, B., Anderson, H., Roff, H., Allen, G., & Cave, S. (2018). The Malicious Use of Artificial Intelligence: Forecasting, Prevention, and Mitigation. arXiv preprint arXiv:1802.07228. https://arxiv.org/abs/1802.07228

Ge, Z., Zhao, Y., Huang, X., Du, X., & Wang, L. (2021). Deepfake Detection Techniques: A Review. arXiv preprint arXiv:2104.00282. https://arxiv.org/abs/2104.00282

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