5 core personality traits that will get you a job

BusinessManagement

  • Author Janine Clay
  • Published November 11, 2020
  • Word count 684

When we think of “skills” for work, often we think only of those competencies we put on our resume: the core skills we’ve learned such as programs, platforms, diplomas and degrees. Often, we forget that we possess many different core skills, particularly those interpersonal skills that could land us the job of our dreams.

What makes a good personality?

According to Wikipedia, confidence is important as well as being humorous and nice. “Always be cool, calm and collected,” WikiHow says. “In every single situation you are in you always have to remember to keep your cool. Never start arguments unless it is for a strong argument and you have good argumentative skills. Never argue with people you would like to remain friends with.

#1: A POSITIVE ATTITUDE

Do you have a winning, positive attitude? Well, you should! The Encyclopaedia of Natural Medicine says, “The largest part to your overall health is from your mental health. Having positive mental health gives us the motivation to do our best. It also makes is strive to do better.”

You don’t need to be happy all the time, but learning to take the good with the bad can be essential to managing your own mental health landscape.

#2: AWESOME COMMUNICATION SKILLS

How awesome are you, exactly? Developing good communication skills is essential to getting ahead at work. Subscribers to the Harvard Business Review rated “the ability to communicate” the most important factor in making an executive “promotable,” more important than ambition, education, and capacity for hard work.

The human resources About page says, “Build the relationship first… send the message, each time (you) communicate, that you care about the receiver of the message. You should demonstrates that, no matter how busy or overextended you are, you have time to care about your co-workers.

#3: LEARN TO MANAGE YOUR TIME WELL

Gwyneth Paltrow had a row with Madonna over the singer’s constant lateness

Being on time shows people that you are respectful of theirs. I have two adorable girlfriends who would always be late – to parties, coffee dates, gym sessions. When someone is late they are saying to you, “My time is more valuable than yours.” It is extremely rude.

I found this great quote for you where Gwyneth Paltrow fell out with Madonna over trainer Tracey Anderson’s workout program. It’s awesome!

“Paltrow lauded Anderson to the skies, while also remarking: ‘Yeah, it’s good that she doesn’t train Madonna any more. It was too much. She keeps people waiting – it takes up your whole day.’ Even more cryptically she admitted: ‘Oh yes, I can be mean. I can cave in to gossip. I can ice people out and I can definitely harbour revenge. In fact, I’m having a situation right now with a friend where I’m feeling pretty angry. But revenge is corrosive and it doesn’t make me feel good.’” Want to read the whole scathing report? Check it out here.

Back to managing your time. “It’s important that you develop effective strategies for managing your time to balance the conflicting demands of time for study, leisure, earning money and job hunting,” according to Kent University. “Time management skills are valuable in job hunting, but also in many other aspects of life, from revising for examinations to working.”

#4: COPING WITH EASE WHEN UNDER PRESSURE

According to the Stress and wellbeing in Australia survey, “In 2013, Australians reported significantly higher levels of stress and distress compared with findings in 2012.” Significantly more Australians reported moderate to severe levels of distress compared with findings of 2012.

Also, similar to previous years’ findings, younger adults continued to report much higher levels of stress and distress compared with older Australians.

#5: BE FLEXIBLE

The demand for flexible working arrangements, as well as flexible methods of study, has grown in recent years. The Australian Bureau of Statistics reports that nearly 150,000 students are studying online or “off-campus” in higher education alone – and that number is much higher when you include VET students. Aim to be as flexible as possible to ensure you make the lasting impression you want to potential employers.

Janine Clay is a professor of journalism at UCLA and worked two years at Berkeley today spend here quarantine days writing about many different subjects https://about.me/janineclay

Article source: https://articlebiz.com
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