Best Careers of 2010 and How to Transfer to Them

BusinessManagement

  • Author Mary Lee Gannon
  • Published April 24, 2010
  • Word count 489

U.S. News and World Report has released its list of the Best Careers for 2010. While unemployment hovers at around 10% and 16 million unemployed people face a paltry 2.5 million job openings each month the good news is that productivity is increasing. Productivity is measured by dividing output by hours worked. Does this mean that employers will not replace the jobs that were eliminated? Productivity allows more to be produced with less capital. Most economists agree that while productivity improvements can produce a short-term increase in unemployment, in the longer run increased productivity will raise the demand for workers and earnings because of the available capital.

Technology, the environment and baby boomers are keeping the job market on its toes. The wave of retiring baby boomers allows for opportunities in the financial planning industry. The field of education is in need of teachers as many boomers retire. As boomers age, there will be increased call for healthcare professionals to care for them. New forms of energy-from water supply to waste management-are seeing strong growth. And technology continues to produce important and popular additions to our daily lives, creating opportunities in the IT sector.

Below are the specific areas where the new economy has opened opportunities in the job market.

Business and Finance

Actuary

Training specialist

Financial adviser

Financial analyst

Market research analyst

Accountant

Loan officer

Public relations specialist

Cost estimator

Meeting planner

Logistician

Comment Print

Healthcare

X-ray technician

Veterinarian

Lab technician

Physical therapist

Occupational therapist

Registered nurse

Physician assistant

Optometrist

Physical therapist assistant

Dental hygienist

School psychologist

Science and Technology

Computer software engineer

Systems analyst

Network architect

Biomedical engineer

Environmental science technician

Hydrologist

Environmental engineering technician

Civil engineer

Meteorologist

Education and Civic

Firefighter

Mediator

Clergy

Urban planner

Special-ed teacher

Court reporter

Medical and public health social worker

Emergency management specialist

Marriage and family therapist

Creative and Service

Commercial pilot

Technical writer

Funeral director

Security system installer

Landscape architect

Plumber

Film and video editor

Multimedia artist

Gaming manager

Curator

Can you transfer your skills to these industries? Can you be a technical write as opposed to a creative writer? Can you be a public relations specialist for an IT or financial planning industry instead of for a broader business market? Consider where your opportunities are.

Get Mary Lee's free tip sheets on "Transferable Skills - Three Easy Steps to Changing Fields" and "Goal Setting for a Quick Turnaround" at http://www.startingovernow.com/Articles-and-Tip-Sheets.html.

Email this information to a friend. Follow Mary Lee's tips on Twitter at StartingOverNow.

Mary Lee Gannon is a cultural turnaround and leadership expert who went from being a stay-at-home mother with four children to a difficult marriage, divorce, homelessness, and welfare to CEO. Her book "Starting Over - 25 Rules When You've Bottomed Out" is available on Amazon.com and details how she went from an earning capacity of $27,000 annually to president and CEO within just a few years. Visit her Web site at www.StartingOverNow.com

Mary Lee Gannon is a cultural turnaround and leadership expert who went from being a stay-at-home mother with four children to a difficult marriage, divorce, homelessness, and welfare. Her book "Starting Over - 25 Rules When You've Bottomed Out" is available on Amazon.com and details how she went from an earning capacity of $27,000 annually to president and CEO within just a few years. Visit her Web site at www.StartingOvernow.com

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